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Sling spinach and mushroom pizza os

Slicing Veggie Heaven Pizza OS

Slicing Veggie Heaven Pizza OS. Honestly this part is when I know its going to be good. Crunchy crust oh yeah. If you like what you see please support us at patreon. Use the link below.

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spinach mushrooms

Spinach Mushroom Pizza OS

Spinach Mushroom Pizza OS. I always cook the spinach and mushrooms prior to putting them on the pizza os. That initial caramelization is needed in order to get the veggies to lay the way I want them to. If you like what you see please support us at patreon. Use the link below.

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deep dish veggie pizza os

Deep Dish Veggie Pizza OS

Deep Dish Veggie Pizza OS shows the amount of toppings to make sure that each bite is packed with flavor. The cheese hugs the edge of the pan to make sure you have caramelized crust to hang on to as you bring this to your mouth. If you like what you see please support us at patreon. Use the link below.

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veggie heaven

Veggie Heaven Pizza OS

Veggie Heaven Pizza OS is something that gets requested a lot. I’ve heard from people that veggies on a pizza are the only veggies they eat. Well, glad to help. If you like what you see please support us at patreon. Use the link below.

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glutenfree-pizza

Teddi Mellencamp Arroyave Shares a Super-Easy Recipe for Healthy Pizza With “Zero Guilt”

The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills coach has an all-season crowd-pleasing favorite.BY ALESANDRA DUBIN

Teddi Mellencamp Arroyave may maintain a lean and mean physique by keeping herself responsible to the same principles she shares with clients of her All in by Teddi accountability coaching program — but that doesn’t mean she’s sworn off pizza for good.

In fact, The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills coach has shared a Mediterranean pizza recipe she swears by from the healthy food delivery service she uses, Gracefully Fed. Think of it, Teddi says, as “a total guilty pleasure — but with zero guilt.” Sold!

The recipe calls for a cauliflower crust. “I use one that contains a bit of dairy when I feel like flexing,” Teddi says. You’ll also need hummus. (Teddi is allergic to sesame so she makes sure hers is tahini free when she makes it at home. For the Med-inspired topping, gather fresh cucumbers, tomatoes, kalamata olives, and arugula. 

To make the tahini-free hummus, you’ll need: 

1 can of garbanzo beans (drained)
1 to 2 cloves of garlic
1 to 2 tablespoons of olive oil
1 to 2 tablespoons of lemon juice 
1/4 tsp. cumin
1/4 tsp. paprika 
Salt to taste 

Blend in a food processor. “I like mine a bit lemony, so I add lemon juice until it gets a creamy consistency,” Teddi says.

To make the pizza, spread the hummus over the crust. Add the arugula and the rest of the ingredients. Add salt and dill to your liking. 

That’s it! Eat and enjoy — guilt free. 

Read the Full Story Here

grilling-pizza

The art of grilling pizza

With special attention to crust and toppings, the grilling makes slice of heaven

Every time I take a bite of pizza, whether it’s the fancy, wood burning-oven kind, eaten in a white-linen restaurant and served with a tall glass of wine, or a slice, purchased in a hurry and meant only to curb hunger, I think of New York City. I think of a time, more than 10 years ago, when Paul and I visited the city. Our children were little, and we left them in the good hands of their grandmother. It was the time in our lives when we were buried in parenting, and when she showed up for the weekend, our bags were packed and in the car. With speedy hugs, we ran from the house. We left so quickly that tires might have squealed as we pulled away.

That weekend, we saw art and heard music and ate food in restaurants and from vendors on street corners. We drank coffee and wine and stayed up late. There was a loud band in a crowded bar and long, meandering walks — the kind of walks we love to take in New York, where we’re guided by lights and whims and the very pulse of the city. Where we ended up at no place in particular, and that was exactly the place we wanted to be.

There were so many great things about that weekend, including being away from small children (see squealing tires above). Reconnecting with my husband was fantastic, but really, the pizza we ate in the wee hours might have been the greatest thing of all. There had been dinner that night, in a trendy, chefy place, then music, then a lot of walking. We were so, so tired and ready to sleep, but first: we wanted a late-night snack.

We found a pizza place in the best kind of way, not by looking for it or reading reviews online or even asking people for the best pizza around. Paul and I walked around a corner and there it was, lights shining into the dark night, a beacon guiding us to good pizza. There was a long line out the door, but the smell wafting from the small shop left absolutely no doubt in our minds. We would wait.

The slices, when we finally had them in our hands, were huge. Each was one quarter of a pie and we ate it in the way proper New Yorkers do, by folding it in half and wolfing it down. And though they offered many different toppings, we decided on the simplest: cheese, tomato and basil. The most remarkable thing about that pie was the crunch of the crust. It was thin crust, with just a whisper of sauce, big basil leaves and puddles of fresh mozzarella.

That pizza is long gone, but the memory is fresh. I’ve thought a lot about that night in New York City, about the pizza and especially, about the crust. How does one create a crust like those made in NYC? Is it possible to do at home? The short answer is no. You cannot. But, you can come close. What’s the best way to make a pizza with crust that’s a little bit chewy and crispy and with a tiny bit of greasiness left on your fingers after you’ve devoured it? On the grill.

It’s true. The same machine you use to cook smoky, beefy burgers, pull-apart ribs and crisp chicken works for pizza, too. If you haven’t tried it, you should. Read on for tips about grilled pizza, toppings and how best to put the two together.

Let’s start with the dough. Before I ever laid a piece of raw pizza dough across a hot grill, I was skeptical. I wondered if the dough would fall between the grates and make a terrible mess. It just didn’t seem possible. But it is possible, and it does work. There are a few key things to do with the dough, to ensure success. First, stretch the dough using olive oil. It shouldn’t be dripping with oil, but it should glisten. Also, stretch it pretty thin. Your dough should be about one-quarter inch thick. Expect dark brown grill marks, and touches of black char. (That’s the good stuff!)

First, the classic pizza recipe, the Margherita. This is the recipe that started it all! It’s not complicated, and I don’t recommend adding or taking away from a simple Margherita pizza. There’s a reason that classics are classics, and this is a great example. The sweet and garlic-y tomato sauce makes an excellent bed for melty, soft cheese. I like to leave the basil leaves whole, just because it looks so fine on the finished pie. Chop them if you like.

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Pizza festival

Pizza festival features Pittsburgh’s top artisanal pizzaiolos

A new gen­er­a­tion of pizzaiolos is ris­ing in Pitts­burgh.

They are young, pas­sion­ate per­fec­tion­ists and stick to an ar­ti­sanal script. For them, the ul­ti­mate pizza is about the dough and not so much about the top­ping.

Neil Blazin (Drift­wood Oven), David Anoia (Piz­ze­ria Da­vide), Kevin Konn (Romu­lus-al Ta­glio), Sara Boyer (Iron Born Pizza), Chris Bartko (Gaba­gool Piz­ze­ria), Mi­chael Mer­cu­rio (Mer­cu­rio’s) and An­thony Am­beli­o­tis (Medi­terra Bake­house) will stretch and bake their ​sig­na­ture pies and serve them oven-hot on June 23 at the Piz­zaFest — A Slice of Del­ish.

The 21-plus event, which is from 6 to 9 p.m. at The Penn­syl­va­nia Mar­ket in the Strip Dis­trict, will fea­ture de­mos on how to stretch dough and make moz­za­rella. Ole Smoky Whis­key Dis­till­ery and Arse­nal Cider House will will pour whiskeys and hard ciders, and discuss how best to pair them with pizzas..

Tickets are $25 online or $35 at the door.

“We are al­ways look­ing for some­thing new and peo­ple here love their pizza,” says Dee Wein­berg of Good Taste Pitts­burgh, who is host­ing the event. “So we wanted to show the high-end of piz­zas.”

Kevin Konn, 38, Romulus Pizza al Taglio

The Mt. Lebanon native attended the now-closed Le Cordon Bleu but settled on making pizzas after going to Seattle. After learning to make Roman pizzas, known for their hydrated dough and slow fermentation, from Massimiliano Saieva at the Roman Pizza Academy in Miami, he opened shop at The Pennsylvania Market in the Strip District last November. He now holds classes on making Roman-style pizzas and helped in picking the participants for the festival.

Rolling Dough with Pizza OS

Pizza for the fest.

“Justin Balla, my partner in crime, and I will have two kinds of Roman pizzas. One is a classic Margherita pizza topped with San Marzano tomatoes, housemade mozzarella and basil. The other is a deconstructed pierogi pizza with Yukon potato puree, cheddar cheese, caramelized onions and kielbasa.”

What sets apart a Roman pizza?

“It is rectangular but is not a Sicilian pizza, which is more dense. The very hydrated dough and fermentation process distinguishes a Roman pizza. The dough has less flour and more water — almost 90% water. I cold proof the dough for four days, then ball the dough and let it sit for eight days at room temp before stretching it out.”

And the crust?

“It looks like it is heavy but it is not because of the air pockets. It is light and crispy and won’t make you want to run a marathon. But it’s more than a snack. I don’t like to use treated flours.”

Are you about the dough or topping?

“I’m always about the dough, which is a great vessel to hold everything. You have to taste the extra-virgin olive oil and the flour. I was taught to make it by the best of the best — Massimiliano Saieva. Science and math are involved in making it.”

What is your beverage of choice with pizza?

“Coke. I will drink the beer afterwards.”

Your go-to pizza?

“It is a marinara pizza with San Marzano tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, fresh garlic, oregano and no cheese. It should not be overwhelmed with toppings.”

What’s your fave shop in town?

It’s Don Campiti’s Pizzeria in Dormont. The pizza is thin and crispy and I grew up on it. It tastes of memories and brings me home.”

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mit-pizza

Cooking Toppings Pizza OS Style

Spinach and Mushroom toppings today

AI out of MIT can cook up perfect pizza recipe from looking at a photo

Chicago deep-dish with pepperoni. New York thin-crust topped with pesto chicken. Vegan, gluten-free with veggies. What do you think makes for the perfect pizza?

A recent study suggests neural networks could create the ultimate pie. The study out of MIT, which appeared earlier this month on Arxiv.org, focuses on a neural network called PizzaGAN that can learn and replicate the ways of making pizza just from looking at photos of pies.

Generative adversarial networks (GANs) use models to make decisions. The PizzaGAN project wants to “teach a machine how to make a pizza by building a generative model that mirrors this step-by-step procedure.” 

PizzaGAN uses a dataset of 9,213 images downloaded from Instagram that show a single pizza. Each image has been assigned a set of labels that describe the toppings but exclude the dough, sauce and cheese. Pictures of 12 pizza toppings, such as arugula, bacon, broccoli, corn, basil, mushrooms and olives, were also added to the dataset for the AI to choose from.

In other words, PizzaGan is shown an image of a pizza, and it first identifies the toppings and then breaks the image down into an ordered sequence of layers showing what went where when. 

While PizzaGAN might be good at figuring which toppings are on a pizza based on images, there aren’t yet any plans to create a brick and mortar pizzeria run by a robot chef. 

But the study, titled “How to make a pizza: Learning a compositional layer-based GAN model,” could lead to the model being used to understand not only other complex recipes, but also any task that has multiple layers. 

“Though we have evaluated our model only in the context of pizza, we believe that a similar approach is promising for other types of foods that are naturally layered such as burgers, sandwiches and salads,” the study said. “It will be interesting to see how our model performs on domains such as digital fashion shopping assistants, where a key operation is the virtual combination of different layers of clothes.”

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