fbpx
Sling spinach and mushroom pizza os

Slicing Veggie Heaven Pizza OS

Slicing Veggie Heaven Pizza OS. Honestly this part is when I know its going to be good. Crunchy crust oh yeah. If you like what you see please support us at patreon. Use the link below.

www.pizzaos.com

Patreon https://www.patreon.com/pizzaos?alert=2
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/originalpizz…
Instagram https://www.instagram.com/theorigonal…
BitChute https://www.bitchute.com/channel/pizz…
Twitter https://twitter.com/pizza_os
LinkedIN https://www.linkedin.com/company/3557…

spinach mushrooms

Spinach Mushroom Pizza OS

Spinach Mushroom Pizza OS. I always cook the spinach and mushrooms prior to putting them on the pizza os. That initial caramelization is needed in order to get the veggies to lay the way I want them to. If you like what you see please support us at patreon. Use the link below.

www.pizzaos.com
Patreon https://www.patreon.com/pizzaos?alert=2
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/originalpizz…
Instagram https://www.instagram.com/theorigonal…
BitChute https://www.bitchute.com/channel/pizz…
Twitter https://twitter.com/pizza_os
LinkedIN https://www.linkedin.com/company/3557…

veggie heaven

Veggie Heaven Pizza OS

Veggie Heaven Pizza OS is something that gets requested a lot. I’ve heard from people that veggies on a pizza are the only veggies they eat. Well, glad to help. If you like what you see please support us at patreon. Use the link below.

www.pizzaos.com

Patreon https://www.patreon.com/pizzaos?alert=2
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/originalpizz…
Instagram https://www.instagram.com/theorigonal…
BitChute https://www.bitchute.com/channel/pizz…
Twitter https://twitter.com/pizza_os
LinkedIN https://www.linkedin.com/company/3557…

Cutting the Cheese Pizza OS Style

Cutting that Cheese

Pizza OS Style

Let’s Make Some Pizza

by Nursery Rhyme

Let’s make some pizza
(Don’t be shy)
We’re making pizza
(Come and try!).

Let’s make some pizza
(For me and you)
We’re making pizza
(And Mom helps too!).

Roll out some dough
(go go go)
Spread out the sauce
(of course!)
And put on the cheese
(yes please)
Then wack on some ham
(yeah man!).

Let’s make some pizza
(Don’t be shy)
We’re making pizza
(pizza pie!).

Mum turn on the oven
(watch it cook)
I think the pizza’s ready
(let’s take a look).

We’ve made some pizza
(Try a slice)
We’ve made some pizza
(mmm it’s nice!).

Eating pizza – so much fun
Eating pizza – yum yum yum.

Read More

Free Pizza

Restaurant Serves Free Pizza

To Guests Who Lock Away Their Phones

A pizza place in California is serving free pizza, but there’s a snare — diners have to agree to lock their cell phones away while consuming their meal.

A Fresno Curry Pizza Company location is running their “Talk to Each Other Discount” promotion. When a party of at least four persons comes into the establishment, they have the choice to lock their cellphones in one of the restaurant’s lockers. If they can get through the whole meal without checking their phone, they either receive a free pizza for their next visit or to take home. Patrons too can donate the pizza to the homeless, if they opt. The pizzeria posted on Facebook about the promotion, stating, “Our goal is to get families/friends to stop using their phones while eating and talk to each other and communicate more. If you like you may receive a free large (per group) on your next visit (must be at least 24 hours) or you can donate your free large pizza to the needy. We donate pizzas to the homeless in downtown Fresno every month, so we would add your donated pizza along with the many others or you could do it yourself.”

Varinder Malhi co-owner, spoke with reporters about the campaign and said he garnered inspiration from his own phone usage. Seeking to set a good example for his children, he ceased using his cell at home (unless it’s for detrimental work use). After witnessing the benefits, he elected to try it out at the pizzeria. Eligible parties must have at least four persons. Too, everyone in the group has to have a smartphone, and they all must turn it in. To make sure every person is playing by the rules, the cashier will inspect every participant’s phone to make certain they have service. This assures that folks are in fact disconnecting and not simply attempting to seize a free pizza with a past phone.

Read More

topofslice

There’s no such thing as ‘bad food.’

Four terms that make dietitians cringe.

By Ellie KriegerColumnist, FoodJune 5

The words we use matter. Our choice of language not only mirrors our current way of thinking, it also has the power to shape our attitudes and behaviors over time. That’s why so many food and nutrition professionals cringe at much of the conversation around food and health today. Seemingly innocuous words and phrases that are regularly tossed around set us up for unhealthy approaches to food. I reached out via email to several of my registered dietitian colleagues to identify the most common offenders — words they wish would be eliminated from the nutrition chatter — and asked them how to reframe that language for a healthier perspective.Good/bad food

Not surprisingly, almost every dietitian I surveyed ranked the categorization of food as good or bad high on their cringe list. It is the root of unhealthy food-speak, as most of the other reviled terms can be traced back to this notion. Pinning a black or white value to one particular food shifts focus from the big picture, the overall eating patterns that really define a person’s well-being. Sure, some foods have a better nutritional profile than others, but context matters immensely. Broccoli may easily win a “good” label, but if all you have eaten all day is broccoli, another serving of it may be the last thing you need.

On the flip side, even foods with a less-than-ideal nutritional breakdown can have unquantifiable health benefits. Take pizza for example. “Pizza is often demonized as ‘bad’ because it is high in fat, high in refined carbohydrates and easy to overindulge” with, wrote Chris Mohr, co-founder of the nutrition consultation company Mohr Results. “But if that pizza isn’t an everyday occurrence and it brought friends together, encouraged conversation, laughing and connection, the otherwise ‘bad’ food becomes nurturing for your soul. Food inherently is not good or bad.”

Besides setting you up to overeat broccoli and miss out on pizza parties, the good/bad paradigm can lead to extreme, moralistically judgmental attitudes about food. As Deanna Wolfe, co-founder of HealthyBody Nutrition put it, “People use ‘good’ or ‘bad’ to describe food as if you are ‘good’ or ‘bad’ for eating them. This only leads to guilt and stress over eating! You are not good for eating kale and bad for eating ice cream.”

Also, labeling foods “bad” can make them even more desirable, as Rahaf Al Bochi, owner of Olive Tree Nutrition and spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has found. When her clients declare certain foods “forbidden,” they are more likely to be preoccupied with thoughts of those foods and crave them more intensely.Clean eating

The notion of clean eating is an offshoot of the good/bad food concept that marketers seem to adore, to the dismay of many dietitians. “The original [clean eating] philosophy appears to be one I think we could all get on board with: eating food as close to its original state as possible, in the most nutritious form possible (a.k.a. minimally processed). But what was once a sense of awareness about food seems to have spiraled into a diet-culture-driven system. On social media, it’s become yet another form of body and food-shaming,” explained Jaclyn London, author of “Dressing on the Side” and nutrition director of Good Housekeeping. “No matter what, the alternative to ‘clean’ sounds fearmongering.”

Elizabeth Ward recoils at the term, too, which she wrote about it in her food and nutrition blog Better Is the New Perfect: “I can’t get past the notion that if you’re not eating ‘clean,’ then you’re eating ‘dirty.’ ”

Declaring foods clean or dirty is not merely a simplistic misrepresentation, as with calling foods good or bad, it could ultimately be downright unhealthy, fostering overly restrictive eating (and the bingeing that often follows) and unwarranted self-judgment around food.

Read More

No Pork on pizza

Sausage Not Made from Pork

Is this really a big deal?

What what’s the deal with pork? When I first started on this journey I had given up hamburgers for Lent. I was introduced to turkey burgers. It opened my mind that there were alternatives to ground meats and if spiced correctly it would taste just as good.

I had the same thought with pepperoni. What were the alternatives? I was never a ham guy and quite frankly the only pork products I eat are baby back ribs and crispy bacon. Therefore, I wanted to come up with turkey and beef versions fo sausage and pepperoni.

Its healthier than pork and I wanted to make sure that people who didn’t eat pork could try this pizza. All the Abrahamic religions dont allow for pork to be eaten so Jews, Christians and Muslims if they are devout and follow would’t be able to try the pizzas but now they can.

Now for a Pizza Poem

PIZZA AMERICA’S FAVORITE

Thick or thin, it is the Friday night order in special, Supreme or meat lovers delight, whatever toppings You like it, does not matter for it’s  The... Read More
Half and Half

Half Pepperoni & Sausage

Half pepperoni & sausage?

Playing with toppings is great but I love the classics. I also like to use other ingredients to make staples on pizzas. I use beef and turkey to make pepperoni and sausage. Mo one has been able to tell the difference and its not as fatty. Also people with certain diets can also enjoy these pizzas.

Playing with toppings is great but I love the classics. I also like to use other ingredients to make staples on pizzas. I use beef and turkey to make pepperoni and sausage. Mo one has been able to tell the difference and its not as fatty. Also people with certain diets can also enjoy these pizzas.

I even do enjoy Pineapple on pizza but this is the only thing that is in left field that I would consider. Recently in the Washington Post they addressed this topic.

Tim Carman starts by stating “At some point in the never-ending debate over whether pineapple belongs on pizza, the haters, maybe with tongues pressed against cheek, invoked Godwin’s Law. Yep, they compared those who like the tropical fruit on pies to Hitler. One said they were worse than Hitler. The comparison would become a common insult, occasionally even flung back at the snobs who turn their nose up at a pineapple-topped pizza.” See the full article here.

second layer of dough - Pizza OS

Adding the 2nd Layer

Swirl Dough to the Pizza OS

What can I say about such a fun project for my kids. What we did here is simply use food coloring in the dough and put a second layer of dough and cheese making this a double decker. Nothing here but it was fun.

cuttingthepizzaos

Cutting the Pizza OS

When cutting this Pizza OS notice this is a thinner version of a mushroom and spinach Pizza OS. Notice the perimeter crust is browned. Perfect for holding and it won’t fold so you can eat your slice.